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In the Media

TruckCamperMagazine - "DOG RESCUE STORY"

TruckCamperMagazine - "SIX-PAC PRESS ROOM"

TruckCamperMagazine - "HORSING AROUND"

TruckCamperMagazine - "BREAKING NEWS"

TruckCamperMagazine - "SIX-PAC INTRO"

TruckCamperMagazine - "SIX-PAC COME BACK"

SIX-PAC IS BACK - TRAILER LIFE

SIX-PAC IS BACK! - HUNTING AND FISHING NEWS

SIX-PAC SC-150 SELF-CONTAINED SLIDE-IN CAMPER - FOUR WHEELER MAGAZINE

MAKE YOUR X-RAY LAB MOBILE - QUALITY MAGAZINE

Press Releases

SIX-PAC INTRODUCES THE MARKET'S ONLY TRUE SELF-CONTAINED CAMPER FOR SHORT-BED TRUCKS

SIX-PAC ANNOUNCES MID-SEASON RELEASE OF REDESIGNED TRUCK CAMPERS

SIX-PAC MOBILE LABS ANNOUNCES ROLL-OUT OF COMMERCIAL-GRADE MOBILE DARKROOM




SIX-PAC IS BACK - TRAILER LIFE

TRAILER LIFE - JUNE 2004 by Jeff Johnston
There's nothing quite like waking up in a place where the only noise is the wind, and the only sign of man's encroachment is the gravel road leading to your campsite. That's what we experienced during our Six-Pac road test, and the sight of the Cascade Range tinted by the early sun stretching horizon to horizon was just a step beyond our front door. Morning coffee is seldom this impressive.

Six-Pac Campers in Trailer Life Magazine RVers who might describe themselves as a bit long in the tooth may recall Six-Pac as a camper manufacturer with a long history. After many years of keeping a low profile in the business, Six-Pac was purchased by Four Wheel Campers. The new owners are actively retooling and upgrading the Six-Pac line with new features for improved comfort and quality. In addition, the owners are also paying close attention to the swings in the light-truck market and are planning campers to match the new and popular smaller-size and smaller-bed pickup models. Customers can specify a wide range of design changes or accessory amenities, and factory sales and delivery are also part of the Six-Pac business plan.

For would-be camper owners for whom cost is a concern, the SC-150RD is highly affordable. It's not as plush and fancy as some of its competitors on the market, but for a $9,610 MSRP you get a fully outfitted accommodating camper that can take you a lot of fun places in comfort and style. We were also impressed by the overall quality control evident in this camper, a sign that the manufacturer has done its homework and has assembled affordable materials with care and craftsmanship.

The SC-150RD is part of Six-Pac's line designed for mid- or full-sized half-ton trucks, and it's better suited atop a half-tonner with a somewhat higher-end gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) than that of the Toyota Tundra we used. With an 1,807-pound wet-but-empty weight, the camper pushed the combo 360 pounds over the truck's GVWR, and that was without any passenger or cargo weight in the mix. Even though the factory gets away with using this truck to deliver campers to dealers, it's definitely the wrong truck for a full-time matchup with this camper model.

Livability

Our campsite was roughly eight miles up a gravel logging road off U.S. Highway 58 near Oakridge, Oregon, a location that almost guarantees scenic beauty. Parked and leveled, we lowered the optional manual-crank jacks ($500) using a cordless drill fitted with a hex driver (sized to match the jack cranks) to speed the process. The jacks add stability to the rig while occupants move about inside.

Climbing in and out of a camper can call for a trudge up collapsible stairs or use of some other hardware. Our rig came equipped with an aluminum E-Z Step that made entry and exit painless and stress-free.

Six-Pac Campers in Trailer Life Magazine

Given the limited square footage of a shortbed pickup bed and a camper that doesn't overhang the aft end of the bed, there's only so much that can be done in a slide-in camper. A rig such as this is functional at providing clean, climate-controlled living space in a small package, but it's not a stretch-out elbowroom kind of environment. We accept that, and take the Six-Pac for what it economically and effectively provides for camping enjoyment.

For example, we appreciate a good night's sleep. The Six-Pac cabover bed is a full 60 X 80 inches, so two full-size adults fit thereon with room to spare. A low-profile cabinet along the curbside end of the bed is handy for books and other necessities, and a padded seat at the front of the floor space makes for an easy climb into bed.

There's also a 33 X 74-inch sleeping space when the dinette seat is folded down into a bed, so a guest can be accommodated. As a dinette, the overhanging refrigerator blocks the forward end. Mealtimes for any more than two adults could be snug if everyone is packed inside the camper.

The simple-but-complete galley has a two-burner stove and a single-bowl sink, and those are adequate for meal preparation when the cook plans ahead. The counter space nearby is fine as well, and gives the cook enough room to stash food-preparation hardware. The manufacturer has recently changed the kitchen cabinets so one is sized to accommodate a small microwave and the others are deeper and taller.

General storage space is on the slim side in this camper, as there's no hanging wardrobe. For moist coats and the like, we'd add a removable hanging bar in the wet bath, and we used small duffel bags to contain our camping gear that wouldn't easily store in the overhead cabinets for this trip. Extra space is also available under the dinette seats and below the kitchen counter.

Climate control is important to us, but our weather was mild so we didn't need either air conditioner or furnace. A delightful breeze kept us company at our hilltop site, and the camper's standard windows provided lots of flow-through fresh air.

Six-Pac Campers in Trailer Life Magazine

There's no AC-generator option for this camper, and ours drew dry-camp power from its single group 27 12-volt battery. More recent models have a two-battery compartment that can accommodate dual group 27s or a pair of 6-volt batteries. Product upgrades are ongoing at Six-Pac.

Cleaning up after a dusty day on the trail is also important. The Six-Pac wet bath isn't extremely large, but it gets the job done and leaves a refreshed feeling that makes for a much more enjoyable evening. Modest freshwater and wastewater capacities mean you won't spend a lot of time showering anyway - a quick hose off does the trick. The freshwater toilet equipment in the same space is snugly arranged, but surprisingly usable by even a big guy.

All things considered, the Six-Pac SC-150 provides a delightful camping experience in an affordable package. It can fit a lot of the lighter-rated pickups on the road today without causing concern over major pickup-equipment upgrades. It's a tight fit inside when a couple of adults get to meandering, but the Six-Pac is still a long shot ahead of a tent for camping fun.


SIX-PAC IS BACK! - HUNTING AND FISHING NEWS

HUNTING AND FISHING NEWS
The classic California truck camper - the Six-Pac - is back.and better than ever!

A favorite since the 1960s, today's Six-Pac meets the diverse needs and demands of the modern camper. From updated core designs to expanded amenities, all of Six-Pac's models offer the features that ideally complement a variety of active lifestyles.

Advances and Improvements

Six-Pac's Standard and Delux models offer more spacious adult sleeping accommodations in the newly designed cabover queen- or king-sized bed, the convertible dinette area and a sturdy flip-down bunk that, when closed, also provides additional overhead storage space. Both the Standard and Delux models offer a galley, refrigerator, picture windows and an array of optional features. The Delux model - designed for full-sized trucks - offers a self-contained shower and toilet.

The Only Self-Contained Camper for Short-Bed Trucks

For the first time, the convenience of a full-sized toilet and shower is available in a camper specifically designed for a short-bed truck! The newest Six-Pac model is the Delux 650 - the only true self-contained camper for short-bed pick-up trucks on the market.

The Delux 650 reflects a number of thoughtful design features that maximize interior storage yet retain spacious adult sleeping accommodations, including an extended cabover queen bed and additional bunk and dinette area beds. Most notable of these features, however, is the shower room, which includes a lavatory sink, flush toilet and shower, making the Delux 650 the only short-bed camper to offer these key amenities. The Delux 650 also offers a galley, refrigerator, picture windows and an array of optional features.

The Six-Pac Delux 650 meets a longstanding need among lightweight-camper consumers who want a full-feature camper that is tailor-made for their short-bed truck. Short-bed truck owners no longer have to sacrifice towing capability or maneuverability in order to enjoy full-sized amenities.

The Only Product of its Kind on the Market

The Six-Pac Utility offers a spacious, versatile "working camper." The Utility model has a sleek, open interior, unencumbered by a galley, refrigerator or closets, and is ideal for transporting anything from tools to toys to tack. The Utility also can be factory-customized to suit many of the particular storage and transportation needs of hobbyists, sports enthusiasts and others with specific requirements.

Hand-Built in the U.S.A.

All Six-Pac models are hand-built in the company's Riverside, California plant in a variety of sizes to accommodate the full range of truck-bed configurations and pay loads, including mini trucks (such as Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma), mid-size trucks (such as Dodge Dakota and Chevy Colorado) and all half-ton, three-quarter-ton and one-ton trucks.

Lightweight. Economical. The Original.

Founded in 1967, Six-Pac pioneered the lightweight camper concept and is the leader in the half-ton pick-up camper market. Whether it's the maneuverability, economy or exceptional comfort that leads you to a Six-Pac truck-camper, we're confident that no matter where your adventures take you, you'll be glad you're making the trip in a Six-Pac.


Six-Pac SC-150 self-contained slide-in camper - FOUR WHEELER MAGAZINE
Click here for a PDF of this article

Six-Pac Campers in Four Wheeler MagazineFOUR WHEELER MAGAZINE
by Robin Stover
This may seem like a stray from the usual Bed Toys piece, but there's nothing about Four Wheeler that's usual nowadays. So we thought it might be interesting to showcase another unique toy that's designed to go in the bed of your 4x4 pickup.

Six-Pac is known in the compact-camper arena for having a well-rounded catalog of self-contained, slide-in campers that until recently have kept a pretty low profile in the off-road scene. However, Six-Pac was recently purchased by Four Wheel Campers of Woodland, California. Four Wheel Campers is well known for building those 4x4-friendly, pop-up-style cab-over campers that feature minimalist accommodations and just enough room for two adults to sleep comfortably. The convergence of the two companies has resulted in several improvements in both product lines. We tested an '04 SC-150 RD slide-in for a weeklong excursion in beautiful Northern California to evaluate the improved design and see just how much it affected our long-term Dodge Ram 2500's off-road abilities.

What we found surprised us. Thanks to its lightweight construction, the SC-150 RD felt more like a load of home improvement supplies than a fully self-contained cab-over camper. Our 3/4-ton Cummins-powered Ram made short, predictable side-to-side movements during hard cornering. We're told this is easily remedied by the OE antisway bar, which ours was not equipped with. The added weight of the camper actually helped our Ram's open rearend maintain traction over loose terrain.

The SC-150 RD's floorplan offers ample room for amenities such as a full walk-in shower room with a flush toilet and lavatory sink, a kitchen area with a two-burner gas stove, a 3.0- cubic-foot refrigerator, an angled galley sink, and all the regular items like a queen bed with overhead storage cabinets and an L-shaped settee that converts to a double bed. Behind the scenes are a very effective 6-gallon hot water heater, a 40-gallon freshwater tank, and a 38-gallon wastewater vessel. Outside, our home away from home kept on impressing us with smart features like an exterior shower, and an aluminum ladder that allowed easy access to the walk-on EPDM rubber rooftop that doubles as the perfect setting for watching sunsets.

Most slide-in campers on the market today feature options similar to the SC-150 RD's, but few can claim the impressive 1,650-pound dry weight rating, and even fewer have a low base price of just $9,985 like the Six Pac. With all those creature comforts wrapped into such a lightweight and affordable package, we believe the Six Pac will likely find a steady demand in and among the weekend warriors and semi-retired crowd.


Make Your X-Ray Lab Mobile - QUALITY MAGAZINE

By Tom Hanagan

QUALITY MAGAZINE
New materials and construction allow advanced use of X-ray technology in the field.

The concept of the mobile radiography darkroom has been around for decades. Applications are broad, and when it comes to real-life practice, ingenuity reigns.

Job contracts extending over long periods often employ a trailer converted to a lab. Parked at the job site, the unit requires no re-spotting or the expense of daily transit back to the shop. Some of these units even split the space with a revolving door to provide office as well as darkroom areas, eliminating the shift between work stations and associated down time.

In other more extreme instances, ocean shipping containers have been converted to darkrooms. These configurations are rugged and durable, but also heavy and difficult to handle at the job site. Container-housed darkrooms have been used in such diverse geographies as the Sahara Desert in North Africa and Trinidad in the Caribbean, and in some instances have been mounted on skids and pulled across sand or soil to various test sites. Although there are a number of variations of the mobile darkroom concept, the configuration most widely used is the tried-and-true camper-style truck-mounted unit.

NDT accelerates change

Six-Pac Mobile Labs
The increasing applications for digital imaging and other methods of NDT will accelerate further change in mobile darkroom technology and construction.
Photo: Six-Pac Mobile Labs

While the truck-mounted configuration is essentially a box on wheels - the basic parameters of which have not changed significantly since it inception - methods and materials of construction have evolved over the years, taking advantage of new processes and products and leading to advances in durability and performance.

The increasing application of digital imaging, as well as other methods of nondestructive testing (NDT), will surely bring about and accelerate further changes as the mobile darkroom strives to accommodate these and other emerging technologies. The most common uses for the truck-mounted unit are refinery and pipeline testing, but other venues such as aircraft inspection are fairly common.

Construction Methods
Two primary methods of construction are familiar to most in the industry, the wood-frame unit and the fiberglass lay-up. The typical wood-frame unit with interior paneling and exterior "skin" is common. Variations on this theme include different interior applications, such as laminated surfaces, providing greater durability and smooth exterior surfaces such as fiberglass or flat metal panels, which can be more appealing and easy to customize with graphics. When considering flat exterior skin, however, manufacturers should keep in mind that repairs can be involved and costly, and durability may be less than that of typical sectioned aluminum siding.

The other common construction is fiberglass lay-up. Much like a boat, the resin and glass strand exterior structure is hand laid or "chop gunned," and although strong, is heavy, susceptible to cracking and often expensive to repair. Variations on basic construction methods include tube frames, usually steel, but the future will see aluminum frames with either aluminum siding or fiberglass sheet. Aluminum frames with composite walls - typically a sandwich of panel, foam and fiberglass skin - also show promise.

Storage and flooring
After the basic consideration of the frame, interior build-out centers on one crucial focal point: storage. More is better. Cabinets and drawers make all the difference in how well a unit is received by those in the field. When comparing manufacturers, it is helpful to examine hinges, latches and handles. Is the hardware durable enough for the rigors of field work? Are the storage compartments large enough?

Six-Pac Mobile Labs
Storage is a crucial focal point of interior build-out centers. Cabinets and drawers should be plentiful and durable to accommodate the rigors of the field.
Photo: Six-Pac Mobile Labs

Cabinetry should be made of durable material such as plywood, preferably a hardwood such as mahogany, because particle board will hold up in wet environments. Tough facings are part of durability, too. Formica has a consistent surface and is easy to clean. Melamine is a thinner surface and more susceptible to damage. In all facings, low scratch resistance or brittle surfacing should be avoided.

Flooring, a common source of problems in the mobile darkroom, varies. Ranging from a painted surface to a fiberglass "tub," many types can be found in the marketplace. While rolled or brushed coatings generally do not hold up well, a sprayed surface-type coating is tough and resilient, as is industrial rubber flooring.

Modern rubber sheeting has made huge strides in durability. For example, the advent of urethane has resulted in a product made of recycled car tires. Tires are ground up into a crumb-like consistency, mixed with urethane, cured in a tube-shaped drum and shaved like a plywood core into sheets. The resulting product is used in gyms, health clubs, garages, industrial work locations, and, of course, mobile darkrooms.

For all types of floors, it is crucial that the seams be adequately sealed. It is even more advantageous for the floor to be seamless. Beyond this, the floor should be made of a material that resists cracking, splitting, and punctures.

Lighting and other factors
When considering the lighting and electrical aspects of the unit, flexibility makes for a better work station. A variety of light sources allows for separate steps in the task process. Over-counter lights, ceiling lights, porch lights and floodlights make for a safer and less mistake-prone environment. Given the harsh conditions of a pipeline project, floodlights make a world of difference in working around the mobile unit.

The unit should include a comprehensive system with adequate receptacles - 12-volt DC and 120-volt AC - and a converter with onboard battery storage and charging. Driving between locations or connecting to shore power should charge the auxiliary 12-volt-deep cycle battery.

Six-Pac Mobile Labs
Job contracts extending over long periods often employ a camper converted to a lab. The unit, parked at the job site, requires no re-spotting or the expense of daily transit.
Photo: Six-Pac Mobile Labs

Generator compartments are either an integral necessity or an unwanted option. Many manufacturers prefer a bumper-mounted generator or none at all - they use available shore power - and space allocated for generator storage is addressed as an extra storage compartment. Many manufacturers allow either consideration for a specific location. If not a generator compartment, cabinets may be made accessible from the exterior, and outside storage of dirty, wet and heavy items is easier and less obtrusive to the inside work area. Cable reels, tools and boots are good candidates for this type of facility.

Weather conditions dictate the need for air conditioning, heat or both. Air conditioners are located on the roof or the back wall. If on the roof, it is important to consider where the unit will be deployed to avoid overhangs, branches and other obstacles that can shave off a unit. Rear wall units, which can be easily and cost-effectively replaced, can serve in many applications.

Developing tanks are pivotal in the performance of the unit. Fiberglass and plywood tanks serve as the benchmark of the industry. Despite their great weight, they have performed well over time. New tanks of materials such as polyethylene also show promise. They are of lighter weight, more easily handled and allow for simple valve replacement and overall ease of repair.

Other factors to be considered include weight and wind resistance, both of which affect the truck towing the unit. Lighter units will have less impact on gas mileage and a more streamlined profile. Over the life of the unit and the trucks it travels on, a more lightweight unit can pay for itself. Lighter weight, lower profile units are particularly indicated for job sites in harsh geographies. Working a pipeline in the densely wooded Northwest is a good illustration. The cabover portion of the unit provides not only streamlining but storage.

The options
Base cost is just the beginning. It's important to factor in what options or modifications will be needed to put the unit in active service, and how quickly any outfitting can be completed by the manufacturer or purchasing company. In some cases, it is not simply the list of desired options that makes the unit ideally suited for the job; the layout itself might facilitate the specific tasks that the technicians will be performing.

Consider this when embarking on a new unit purchase:

    1.  How large a unit is needed?
    2.  Where will it be used?
    3.  What construction type works best for a manufacturer's needs?
    4.  Is weight a consideration?
    5.  Does the unit need to be transferred from truck to truck?
    6.  What are the real budget and cost considerations?
    7.  Are the available options adequate?
    8.  Is customizing available?
    9.  Is the unit repairable if necessary? Are replacement parts readily available?
    10.  Does the unit fit the technicians' needs?
While the practice of mobile radiography continues to evolve alongside strides being made in imaging technology, the future promises many more years of developing film in the field. Careful consideration of the aforementioned factors can help guide companies that are striving to balance the conceptual advances on the horizon with the day-to-day realities of the field.

Special thanks to Mike Delgado at International Inspection, Inc., Greg and Larry Williams at Valley Industrial X-Ray, Mark Hill at South Bay Inspection, Dave Nezzar and Steve Frysinger at IQS, Dave Ruml at Valley X-Ray, and Joe Arizu at Edge T&I for sharing their insight and expertise.

Tom Hanagan is President of Six-Pac Mobile Labs (Woodland, CA). He can be contacted at tom@fourwh.com.


SIX-PAC INTRODUCES THE MARKET'S ONLY TRUE SELF-CONTAINED CAMPER FOR SHORT-BED TRUCKS

WOODLAND, Calif. - January 26, 2005
Six-Pac Campers today announced the introduction of the Delux 650 - the only true self-contained camper for short-bed pick-up trucks on the market. The Delux 650 (also known simply as the D-650) is the latest in a series of new lightweight camper designs introduced by Six-Pac since its change in ownership two years ago. "For the first time, the convenience of a full-sized toilet and shower is available in a camper specifically designed for a short-bed truck," said Tom Hanagan, president and owner of Six-Pac Campers, Inc. While it is not uncommon for consumers to install a standard-sized camper on their short-bed truck, the camper extends past the end of the truck box. This mismatch in sizing necessitates the use of a hitch extension and makes towing a trailer challenging if not impossible. In addition, the placement of disproportionate weight behind the axle results in potential balance challenges.

"The introduction of the D-650 allows Six-Pac to meet a longstanding need among lightweight-camper consumers who want a full-feature camper that is tailor-made for their short-bed truck," Hanagan said. "Short-bed truck owners no longer have to sacrifice towing capability or maneuverability in order to enjoy full-sized amenities." The D-650 reflects a number of thoughtful design features that maximize interior storage yet retain spacious adult sleeping accommodations, including an extended cabover queen bed and additional bunk and dinette area beds. Most notable of these features, however, is the shower room, which includes a lavatory sink, flush toilet and shower, making the D-650 the only short-bed camper to offer these key amenities. The D-650 also offers a galley, refrigerator, picture windows and an array of optional features. "We are finding that there is no longer such a thing as a 'typical' camper customer," said Hanagan. "This is why lightweight campers continue to grow in popularity - they are extremely varied in their applications. Their economical fuel consumption and outstanding maneuverability make them an ideal choice for everyone from soccer moms in the suburbs to serious sportsmen in the field." The Six-Pac D-650 is priced at $9985.00.

Six-Pac specializes in hand-building lightweight, economical truck campers that fit a variety of truck capacities, bed lengths and styles. Founded in 1967, Six-Pac pioneered the lightweight camper concept and is the leader in the half-ton pick-up camper market. Based in California, Six-Pac sells its campers nationwide directly from factory showrooms. Six-Pac's corporate offices and Northern California showroom are located at 1460 Churchill Downs Avenue, Woodland, California, 95776. Telephone: (530) 666-1442 or (800) 242-1442. The company's manufacturing plant and Southern California showroom are located at 6075 Chapel Street, Riverside, California, 92503. Telephone: (951) 687-4719 or (800) 223-3069. Six-Pac's website is located at www.six-pac.com.


SIX-PAC ANNOUNCES MID-SEASON RELEASE OF REDESIGNED TRUCK CAMPERS

WOODLAND, Calif. - August 23, 2004
Six-Pac Campers today announced the mid-season release of its redesigned truck campers. Three new model series, named Standard, Delux and Utility, have been in pre-production for six months and incorporate many new features and floor plans.

"What we've done is take the classic California truck-camper - the Six-Pac - and update it to meet the diverse needs and demands of the modern camper consumer," said Tom Hanagan, President and Owner of Six-Pac Campers, Inc.

The mid-season models reflect a number of advances and improvements. Most notable among these is increased adult sleeping capacity as well as expanded storage compartments, more comfortable dinettes, traffic-free floor plans and stronger yet lighter-weight construction.

Six-Pac's Standard and Delux models offer more spacious adult sleeping accommodations in the newly designed cabover queen- or king-sized bed, the convertible dinette area and a sturdy flip-down bunk that, when closed, also provides additional overhead storage space. Both the Standard and Delux models offer a galley, refrigerator, picture windows and an array of optional features. The Delux model - designed for full-sized trucks - offers a self-contained shower and toilet.

By contrast, Six-Pac's Utility model offers a spacious, versatile "working camper." The Utility model has a sleek, open interior, unencumbered by a galley, refrigerator or closets, and is ideal for transporting anything from tools to toys to tack. The Utility also can be factory-customized to suit many of the particular storage and transportation needs of hobbyists, sports enthusiasts and others with specific requirements.

"This has been a turnaround year for Six-Pac," said Hanagan, who bought the company eighteen months ago and retooled both its operations and its product. "It's exciting to see this brand, which originated the lightweight truck camper concept here in California back in the 1960s, return to the forefront of the marketplace and appeal to a whole new generation of campers," he said.

"Consumers remember the Six-Pac name, often from camping experiences in their youth" continued Hanagan, "so there's a positive awareness of the product among campers. The improvements we've made in these models enable camper buyers to have that Six-Pac experience all over again, but with the comfort and convenience of modern amenities and design."

"The introduction of the Utility model adds another dimension to the Six-Pac identity, providing a truck-based unit whose primary function is storage and/or workspace rather than traditional camping," said Hanagan. The Six-Pac Utility currently is the only product of its kind on the market.

These new models are hand-built in Six-Pac's Riverside, California plant in a variety of sizes to accommodate the full range of truck-bed configurations and pay loads, including mini trucks (such as Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma), mid-size trucks (such as Dodge Dakota and Chevy Colorado) and all half-ton, three-quarter-ton and one-ton trucks. The Six-Pac Standard base model retails for $5795.00, the Delux for $8795.00 and the Utility for $4295.00.

Six-Pac specializes in hand-building lightweight, economical truck campers that fit a variety of truck capacities, bed lengths and styles. Founded in 1967, Six-Pac pioneered the lightweight camper concept and is the leader in the half-ton pick-up camper market. Based in California, Six-Pac sells its campers nationwide directly from factory showrooms. Six-Pac's corporate offices and Northern California showroom are located at 1460 Churchill Downs Avenue, Woodland, California, 95776. Telephone: (530) 666-1442 or (800) 242-1442. The company's manufacturing plant and Southern California showroom are located at 6075 Chapel Street, Riverside, California, 92503. Telephone: (951) 687-4719 or (800) 223-3069. Six-Pac's Wisconsin showroom is located at S71 W39206 HWY ZZ, Eagle, Wisconsin 53119. Telephone: (262) 495 - 2406. Six-Pac's website is located at www.six-pac.com.


SIX-PAC MOBILE LABS ANNOUNCES ROLL-OUT OF COMMERCIAL-GRADE MOBILE DARKROOM

WOODLAND, Calif. - January 25, 2005
Six-Pac Mobile Labs today announced the roll-out of its mobile, truck-based darkroom unit. With a range of industry-specific interior and exterior features, the Six-Pac mobile darkroom serves as a moveable base for industrial testing operations as well as photographic and radiographic activities.

"We've talked with field technicians in a variety of industries about the features and specifications they would like to see in a mobile imaging unit and then incorporate those suggestions into the Six-Pac Mobile Darkroom," said Tom Hanagan, President and Owner of Six-Pac Mobile Labs.

The initial model is designed specifically for industrial radiography and includes a light-tight workspace with five integrated developing tanks, safelight, a forced-air film-drying cabinet and seamless rubber flooring, to name a few standard features. Options on the Six-Pac Mobile Darkroom include a generator compartment, air conditioner and escape hatch.

"The Mobile Darkroom provides a protected, comfortable workspace that is all-inclusive as well as lightweight and highly maneuverable," Hanagan said. "It's a compact and economical tool both for taking testing equipment directly where it needs to be and then serving as the on-site diagnostic lab."

The Six-Pac Mobile Darkroom is highly customizable and can be outfitted for a wide range of specific tasks and needs. The Mobile Darkroom is ideally suited to assist with testing activities in the utility, engineering, drilling and petroleum industries.

The units are hand-built in Six-Pac's Riverside, California plant in a variety of sizes to accommodate the full range of truck-bed configurations and pay loads, including mini trucks (such as Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma), mid-size trucks (such as Dodge Dakota and Chevy Colorado) and all half-ton, three-quarter-ton and one-ton trucks. The base model retails for $7395.00.

Six-Pac Mobile Labs specializes in hand-building lightweight, economical truck-based labs and darkrooms for a variety of commercial and industrial uses. Based in California, Six-Pac Mobile Labs sells its units nationwide directly from factory showrooms. The corporate offices and Northern California showroom are located at 1460 Churchill Downs Avenue, Woodland, California, 95776. Telephone: (530) 666-1442 or (800) 242-1442. The company's manufacturing plant and Southern California showroom are located at 6075 Chapel Street, Riverside, California, 92503. Telephone: (951) 687-4719 or (800) 223-3069. The company's website is located at www.six-pac.com.


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